Rollright Stones

The Rollright Stones

If you are visiting the Cotswolds and are intrigued by particularly ancient history, you may wish to visit the Rollright Stones, located near the village of Long Compton on the borders of Warwickshire and Oxfordshire in the English Midlands.  These stones are constructed out of oolitic limestone, mined locally, and comprise three different Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments.  They are known as The King’s Men, The King Stone and The Whispering Knights.  The three monuments were erected at different periods of late prehistory, and the fact that they were all constructed here shows that this particular plot of ground was regarded as sacred for quite some time by different societies.

The Whispering Knights was constructed as a burial marker in the Early or Middle Neolithic period.  The second monument to be placed in the area was the King’s Men.  This stone circle was built either in the Late Neolithic Period or in the Early Bronze Age.  Similar structures can be found in the Lake District to the north, implying a connection of some sort.  The King Stone was erected last, and is a single monolith that probably was used as a grave marker in the Bronze Age.

The Cotswold Conservation Board has voted the Rollright Stones to be one of the “Seven Wonders of the Cotswolds.”  They are quite well known worldwide and remain a very popular destination for tourists in the area.  There are a number of folk legends attributed to the stones, and many visitors believe they have mystical qualities.  Regardless of the truth, there is no denying that there is a magical, antiquated atmosphere to the location which is steeped in mystery and reverence.  If you want to experience some of the oldest monuments in England, then you will want to be sure to stop by the Rollright Stones while you are visiting the Cotswolds.

 

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